Tuesday, December 14, 2004

An isolated blog is only an enigma

Reading this piece by Jon Udell sent me back
to my days on the high school chess team. Some members of the team got together to write an allegorical spoof of the high school chess league and called it An Isolated Pawn Is Only An Enigma. Pawns only really have value when they are connected to the other pieces on board. I think it's safe to say that Jon's telephone example resonates with a broader audience, though. :-)

Just yesterday, Ari and I were discussing how to move our internal blog proof-of-concept forward from the preliminary evaluation stage to a real project with detailed plan and appropriate priority. As we talked about the scope, players, and roles, it became clear to us that a group blog wouldn't prove anything and would likely fail. Ari even used the phrase "network of nodes." We also talked about the need for diverse voices with points of intersection.

In short, we need to develop an internal blogosphere, with folks with diverse interests finding and filtering relevant information. Why read all the raw material, when someone you trust can point you to the most relevant information and provide analysis? This sort of communication is inadequately performed via group email today.

Maybe we can eventually invert Churchill's description of the isolated, enigmatic Soviet sphere of influence into a richly connected corporate blogosphere of influence.

1 Comments:

Blogger Guy said...

I agree, adding more nodes is a fine idea. You can expect to see me stand up another over the next week or thereabouts. Easy as pie. It will compete for time with my pre-existing (all external) site, but why not?

This evening, four MSFT patches for the family PC (and Joe Walsh on the TV) had me sketching out - rather than typing in - long overdue posts as promised.

Fortunately, there's plenty new here to chew on for another short while.

PS - Ever seen any of Churchill's paintings?! Serious artistic talent, to compliment that legendary wit.

9:47 PM  

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